Item 6641. NEW YORK'S EARLY JEWS: SOME MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS. A LECTURE BY MALCOLM H. STERN, WITH RESPONSE BY MARC D. ANGEL.

NEW YORK'S EARLY JEWS: SOME MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS. A LECTURE BY MALCOLM H. STERN, WITH RESPONSE BY MARC D. ANGEL.

New York; Jewish Historical Society Of New York, 1976. Item #30740

Original paper wrappers. 8vo. 28 pages. 22 cm. "Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the Jewish Historical Society of New York held at Congregation Shearith Israel, the Spanish & Portugese Synagogue on April 10, 1975." An insightful lecture correcting common misconceptions about early American Jewish History as demonstrated in historical errata discovered throughout years of research, i. E. : the mention of Solomon Stern, an Amsterdam Jew stranded in Boston in 1649, the Jews from Brazil who landed in 1654 being met by a Jacob Barsimson, the boat being in actuality named the Ste Catherine and not the St. Charles, the sprinkling of Ashkenazim among the first Sephardim in America, Marranos in Savannah, Georgia, etc. ; the response of Marc Angel attempts to highlight what Stern’s research indicates, the questions it opens, as well as highlighting recent research on the interrelations of Ashkenazim and Sephardim in America and Europe, such as Spanish inscriptions on Ashkenazic tombs. Malcolm H. Stern (1915–1984) was a "U. S. Reform rabbi, historian, [&] genealogist. Stern, who has been called ‘the father of Jewish genealogy in America, ’ was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1981, Stern joined the faculty of the New York campus of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, initially as counselor for student field work and subsequently as adjunct professor of American Jewish History. There he continued his research, begun in 1950, as genealogist for the American Jewish Archives and the American Historical Society. Stern compiled the pioneering volume American Families of Jewish Descent (1960) , an eight-pound tome containing 26, 000 names researched over the course of 10 years of labor. It was the first genealogical survey of Jewish families who settled in the United States between 1654 and 1840, and was lauded as an invaluable research tool in the fields of American and Jewish history. Many American Protestants and Catholics first learned of Jewish roots and branches in their family trees from Stern's data, which served as an important source for Stephen Birmingham's best-selling novel, The Grandees. " (Gordon in EJ 2007) . Publications of the Jewish Historical Society of New York; number 1. Subjects: Jews - New York (State) - New York. OCLC lists 14 copies worldwide. Light shelf wear. Great condition. (AMR-43-2) X+.

Price: $100.00

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