Item 265417. HIAS ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND OVERSEAS COUNTRIES. 1940 [ANNUAL REPORT]
Item 265417. HIAS ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND OVERSEAS COUNTRIES. 1940 [ANNUAL REPORT]
Item 265417. HIAS ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND OVERSEAS COUNTRIES. 1940 [ANNUAL REPORT]
Item 265417. HIAS ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND OVERSEAS COUNTRIES. 1940 [ANNUAL REPORT]

HIAS ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES AND OVERSEAS COUNTRIES. 1940 [ANNUAL REPORT]

New York: Hebrew Sheltering And Immigrant Aid Society Of America, 1940. Item #36141

1st edition for 1940. Original photo-montage paper wrappers, 8vo, [39] pages. Printed on glossy paper, includes 8 dramatic photos or photo-montages, in addition to the photo-montage on the cover. By the time World War II broke out in September 1939, HIAS “had offices throughout Europe, South and Central America, and the Far East. Its employees advised and prepared European refugees for emigration, including helping them during their departure and arrival…. After Germany invaded and conquered France in mid-1940, HICEM closed its Paris offices. On June 26 1940, two days after France capitulation the main HIAS-HICEM Paris Office was authorized by Portuguese ruler António de Oliveira Salazar to be transferred from Paris to Lisbon. According to the Lisbon Jewish community, Salazar held Moisés Bensabat Amzalak, the leader of the Lisbon Jewish community in high esteem and that allowed Amazlak to play an important role in getting Salazar’s permission to transfer from Paris to Lisbon the main HIAS European Office in June 1940. The French office reopened in October 1940, first in Bordeaux, for a week, and finally in Marseilles in the so-called “free zone” Vichy France. Until November 11, 1942, when the Germans occupied all of France, HICEM employees were at work in French internment camps, such as the infamous Gurs. HIAS looked for Jews who met U. S. State Department immigration requirements, and were ready to leave France…. When all legal emigration of Jews from France ceased, HICEM began to operate clandestinely from the town of Brive la Gaillarde. It had an office in the upper level of the building of the Synagogue led by Rabbi David Feuerwerker, the Rabbi of Brive. Here a small group of HICEM employees – establishing contact and cooperation with the local underground forces of the French resistance – succeeded in smuggling Jews out of France to Spain and Switzerland. Twenty-one HICEM employees were deported and killed in the concentration camps; others were killed in direct combat with the Nazis…. From 1940 onward, HICEM's activities were partly supported by the Joint. Despite friction between the two organizations, they worked together to provide refugees with tickets and information about visas and transportation, and helped them leave Lisbon on neutral Portuguese ships…. In all, some 40, 000 Jews managed to escape Europe during the Holocaust with HICEM’s and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (the Joint's or JDC’s) assistance. HICEM was dissolved in 1945; HIAS continued its work in Europe under its own name” (Wikipedia, 2015) . SUBJECT(S) : Jews -- United States -- Periodicals. Jewish refugees -- United States Migrations. OCLC: 236107957. Very Good+ Condition, an outstanding and beautiful copy. (holo2-126-26-A-'+).

Price: $350.00