Item 243083. MIDAS-HADIN
Item 243083. MIDAS-HADIN
Item 243083. MIDAS-HADIN
Item 243083. MIDAS-HADIN

MIDAS-HADIN מידאס־האדין

Kiev: Kooperativer farlag "Kultur-lige" 1929. Paper Wrappers. Item #42002

1st edition. Original Soviet modernist gray black and white wrappers, 8vo, 265 pages. 21 pages. In Yiddish, usually translated as "Harsh Judgement” or “Measure of Justice.” A translation into English ["Judgement: A Novel”] was published by Northwestern University Press in 2017. The translators note, “Mides hadin (Harsh Judg­ment, 1929) is one of Bergelson’s most innovative and experimental works, both stylistically and thematically….By the time David Bergelson arrived in Berlin in 1921, he was highly regarded as a Yiddish modernist innovator. In Berlin, Bergelson was the coeditor of a short-lived Yiddish and Hebrew modern art journal: in Yiddish, Milgroym (The Pomegranate). He wrote for the New York Yiddish newspaper Forverts (The Forward) and authored dozens of short works, some set in Berlin and others set in the shtetlekh of Ukraine….In 1926, Bergelson publicly shifted his allegiance toward the Soviet Union. To signal this new commitment, he cut ties with Forverts and became a regular staff writer for Morgen-frayhayt, a communist daily; he also visited Moscow, wrote a penitential letter to the Moscow Yiddish newspaper Der emes (The Truth), and penned his critical essay 'Dray tsentrn'('Three Centers'). In 'Three Centers,' Bergelson designated Moscow — not Warsaw or New York — as the well­spring of Yiddish literature. These career moves, however, should not reduce the meaning of Mides-hadin to an unequivocal endorsement of the new Bolshevik régime.….This novel was written after Bergelson’s earlier acclaimed works, such as Opgang (Descent) and Nokh alemen (The End of Everything) had earned him a reputation as one of Yiddish literature’s most important authors. Harsh Judgment unflinchingly confronts the death of the shtetl and the birth of a 'new, harsh­er world' created by the Russian Revolution of 1917, by tracing the establishment of Bolshevik power in a place where people, goods, and counter-revolutionary literature are smuggled across the border. An aura of mystery infuses the opening chapter: the setting is a former monastery, now serving as a jail, interrogation center, and place of execution” (Sasha Senderovich and Harriet Murav in In Geveb, 2015). Part of the series, Bibliotek Yidishe shrayber, Nr 2. 1 of 4000 copies printed. SUBJECT(S): Yiddish fiction. OCLC: 122773263. OCLC lists only 3 copies of the original 1st edition (NYPL, YIVO, ULondon), though it is likely that some of the 9 copies listed as “internet resources” are actually hard copies. Small spine label removed, small number penned on the half-title, which has been poorly opened with resulting tears to the blank outer margins of the page. Otherwise a gorgeous copy in fresh wrappers and beautiful bright white pages. Very Good Condition thus, a scarce and very attractive first edition of this important left-wing avant-garde Yiddish novel by Bergelson. (YID-42-36-’l+).

Price: $1,500.00

See all items in Russia
See all items by