Item 243333. EVREISKIE POGROMY 1918-1921
Item 243333. EVREISKIE POGROMY 1918-1921
Item 243333. EVREISKIE POGROMY 1918-1921
Item 243333. EVREISKIE POGROMY 1918-1921

EVREISKIE POGROMY 1918-1921 ЕВРЕЙСКИЕ ПОГРОМЫ 1918-1921

Moscow; Shkola I Kniga, 1926. Item #42036

First edition and 1 of 5000 copies published. Period boards with photographic front cover mounted on front. 4to, 136 pages. Folio. In Russian. “Jewish Massacre. 1918-1921.” With numerous photographic illustrations. A detailed album highlighting the horrific results of a wave of ferocious pogroms afflicted upon Jewish communities in the Ukraine including Skvira (Skver) , Poltava, Uman, Kiev and Yelizavetgrad during the Civil War years of 1918-21. The text has a distinctly Nationalist element, portraying Jews saved from the attacking native population by the Red Army. The publication was issued by Z. S. Ostrovsky on behalf of the Jewish Committee for Aid to Victims of Pogroms. With well over 200 photos, this work is based on an exhibit of images and documents put together by the Jewish Committee of Victims of Pogroms which was shown in 1923 in Moscow. It’s a brutal depiction of the third set of pogroms which swept in Russia from 1918 and 1921 in the wake of the Russian Revolution, much worse than the earlier massacres in the 1880s and then again in 1903-1906. This post-war set of pogroms were led by bands of soldiers from the disintegrating tsarist army. Ostrovsky's work doesn’t state the fact that the first pogroms to be accompanied by slaughter of Jews were perpetrated by units of the Red Army which retreated from the Ukraine in the spring of 1918 before the German army. These pogroms took place under the slogan "Strike at the bourgeoisie and the Jews." The Jewish communities of Novgorod-Severski and Glukhov in northern Ukraine were the most severely affected. These pogroms reached their climax in the massacre at Proskurov on Feb. 15, 1919, when 1,700 Jews were done to death within a few hours. On the following day, a further 600 victims fell in the neighboring village of Felshtin (Gvardeiskoye). Those responsible for these pogroms went unpunished, and henceforward the Ukrainian soldiers considered themselves free to spill Jewish blood. The Jews regarded Simon Petlyura, the prime minister of the Ukraine and commander of its forces, as responsible for these pogroms. The general chaos which reigned in the Ukraine in 1919 resulted in the formation of large and small bands of peasants who fought against the Red Army. The Jews in the villages, shtetls, and towns there were constantly terrorized by the peasants, who extorted money and supplies from them or robbed and murdered them. One of the most notorious pogroms carried out by the peasant bands was that in Trostyanets in May 1919, when over 400 people lost their lives. In the fall of 1919, there was a wave of pogroms committed by the counterrevolutionary White Army, under the command of General A.I. Denikin. (credit: Klinebooks). See Z. Gitelman, A Century of Ambivalence: The Jews of Russia and the Soviet Union 1881 to the Present (1988) pp. 97-108. SUBJECT(S): Pogroms -- Soviet Union. Jews -- Persecutions – Antisemitism -- Massacres -- Jews -- Ukraine. -- Belarus. -- URSS. Juifs -- Perse´cutions -- URSS. Antise´mitisme -- Massacres -- Juifs -- Bie´lorussie. Soviet Union -- History -- Revolution, 1917-1921. URSS -- Histoire -- 1917-1921 (Re´volution) OCLC: 702135039. OCLC lists 18 copies. Clean internal binding repair, paper toning, wear to boards, later front blank endpaper loose, Good Condition. Dramatic piece. (SPEC-35-4-BLV).

Price: $1,500.00

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