Item 266899. HAGADAH SHEL PESACH (THE COWEN HAGGADAH). THE SEDER SERVICE FOR PASSOVER EVE IN THE HOME [HAGGADAH SHEL PESAH]
Item 266899. HAGADAH SHEL PESACH (THE COWEN HAGGADAH). THE SEDER SERVICE FOR PASSOVER EVE IN THE HOME [HAGGADAH SHEL PESAH]
Item 266899. HAGADAH SHEL PESACH (THE COWEN HAGGADAH). THE SEDER SERVICE FOR PASSOVER EVE IN THE HOME [HAGGADAH SHEL PESAH]
Item 266899. HAGADAH SHEL PESACH (THE COWEN HAGGADAH). THE SEDER SERVICE FOR PASSOVER EVE IN THE HOME [HAGGADAH SHEL PESAH]

HAGADAH SHEL PESACH (THE COWEN HAGGADAH). THE SEDER SERVICE FOR PASSOVER EVE IN THE HOME [HAGGADAH SHEL PESAH] סדר הגדה של פסח

New York: Jewish Welfare Board, 1935. Item #42744

Original blue printed paper wrappers, 12mo, 128 pages. Includes illustrations and music (The last 28 pages are music) 19 cm. Text in Hebrew. Translation and notes in English. Includes Romanized (Transliterated) Hebrew music lyrics.
The first Hagadah translated by a Woman. This edition was issued for US soliders at the beginning of the Holocaust period. The 1904 1st edition is Goldman-Kinsberg #155, Yaari (1961) #1670, and Yudlov #2277.
"A completely revised English translation with new notes, music and illustrations….With a Passover eve calendar for 50 years." On verso of title page:: "Dedicated to the memory of Prof. and Mrs. Solomon Schechter, whose interest in the work was an inspiration."
“ it should not be surprising that the most popular haggadah in the United States in the first quarter of the 20th century was arranged, edited and translated by a woman. Before feminism, before Maxwell House, there was Lillie Goldsmith Cowen.
Mrs. Philip Cowen, as she preferred to be called, was the wife of the first publisher of the Jewish weekly newspaper American Hebrew. She worked with him side by side, editing and typesetting that publication from the time they married in 1887 until his retirement in 1906. In 1904, she published the Cowen Haggadah, the first mass-produced adaptation of the haggadah in modern American vernacular. Hundreds of thousands of copies were sold all over the world and were distributed to American Jewish servicemen in both World Wars” (Guber in Jewish Journal, 2007).
“Up until then, all American traditional Haggadot had used translations based on those created by David Levi and Isaac Levi (London).
In the preface to the Cowen Haggadah, Lillie writes:
‘At a Seder service given to a number of friends, their wives and older children, the thought occurred to me that the service was marred because of typographical blunders, bad grammar, and mis-translations which abounded in the books used, and, as I knew, in all the books obtainable in this country. I determined, therefore, if the Lord spared me, to issue in the near future a Haggada which would not cause derision among the younger generation but which would be read with interest and with reverence.’
In the publisher's introduction, we find:
’In ‘Who Knows’ some liberty has been taken with numbers eight and nine, in view of the fact that this part of the service is especially designed for the children.’ and indeed, if we look at this section we find:
‘Q: Who knoweth Eight? A. Eight? I know: There are the Eight lights of Hanuka. Q: Who knoweth Nine? A. Nine? I know: Nine was the day in Ab when the holy city was twice destroyed., wherefore a fast was observed.’
Lillie Cowen was not the first to shy away from the traditional phrase ‘Nine months of pregnancy’. The Victorian Rabbi/Rev. A.A. Green had already censored this term in his 1897 ‘Revised Hagada’ under the auspicious of Chief Rabbi Adler. He had come up with the idea that there are 9 festivals in the Jewish year. Lillie's ‘solution’ to use the 9th of Av instead, can be traced back to much older ‘Ashkenazi’ translations, e.g. in the 1712 Amsterdam Haggadah.
However, whereas all the men before her had found it only necessary to censor the nine months of pregnancy, she as a woman felt the need to censor the eight days of circumcision as well” (Wikipedia, based on Goldman).
“The National Jewish Welfare Board (JWB) was formed on April 9, 1917, three days after the United States declared war on Germany, in order to support Jewish soldiers in the U.S. military during World War I….The organization was also charged with recruiting and training rabbis for military service, as well as providing support materials to these newly commissioned chaplains. The JWB also maintained oversight of Jewish chapel facilities at military installations.
In 1941, the United Service Organizations for National Defense was brought into existence through Presidential order February 4. The USO was incorporated in New York state as a private, nonprofit organization, supported by private citizens and corporations. President Franklin D. Roosevelt wanted the morale of military personnel to remain high and believed that current service organizations would be better suited for the job than the Department of Defense.” One of the six organizations was theNational Jewish Welfare Board (NJWB). “These organizations were challenged to handle the on-leave morale and recreational needs for members of the Armed Forces” (Wikipedia).
SUBJECT(S): Haggadot -- Texts. Seder -- Liturgy -- Texts. Judaism -- Textes. Judai¨sme -- Liturgie -- Textes. Haggadot. OCLC: 24135438. OCLC lists 8 copies of the 1935 National Welfare Board edition (Harvard, UMichigan, Duke, Cedar Crest Coll, Penn, UAmsterdam, NLI, Moore Theol Col).
Light wear, very well preserved; the paper and wrappers are bright and strong. About Very Good- Condition. (hag-25-18).

Price: $225.00